There is a fundamental mismatch between the way we organize our senior management teams and the way modern commerce has evolved. Wrapping finesse, technology, rules, bureaucracy, and “science” around our C-Suite conventions, designed for nineteenth-century businesses, is not nearly enough to meet the challenges of modern business environments and practices.


This book is for executives who want to enable their C-Suite, and by extension, their organizations, to survive and thrive in the future. It will help them to foresee future challenges and provide suggestions for new working practices at executive level to successfully adapt to those changes. How should executive teams organize themselves, reinvent their roles, and work with stakeholders to evolve and innovate? What is the role of the new C-grade executive – managers, leaders, or something else?
Executives and aspiring executives will find new challenges for organizations and ways to deal with them. Forward-thinking business students will find startling ideas and practical tools for viewing business and its activities. What is the next evolution of the executive function in organizations? This book explores how we can predict it, shape it, and succeed in it.
Terry White has been helping executives understand and drive positive change in their organizations for 30 years as an author, consultant, advisor, and mentor to C-level executives. He was a CIO for 10 years and has been advising executives on managing in the digital world for the past 20 years. He believes that today’s executives are far too busy to be effective. He has helped executives reflect and think differently to lead their organizations to a new future.

Business expectations of their IT departments are simple: Deliver IT without fuss, get involved in achieving business results, and provide leadership. But while business emphasis is on business results and leadership, IT is focused on the technology.

How to get your IT Department to Add Real Value to Business presents a practical framework that defines the roles and activities for the CIO to meet business expectations. It introduces a new approach to IT in large organizations, which shifts the focus from day to day technological operations to three critical areas of performance for IT: IT management, business results and information leadership.

The concepts are simple and elegant but the implementation is increasingly demanding. However, these changes are essential if in-house IT functions are to survive and prosper in organizations.

The author's framework has already proven itself in changing business and IT perspectives significantly. Large organisations have commenced the implementation process, and are reporting significant results. The book offers ground-breaking perspectives on the role of IT in organisations. These perspectives are finding favour with business and IT people alike. The book offers practical and anecdotal examples and plans to assist in implementing the framework.

'Reinventing the Information Technology Department' is both anecdotal and informal but deals with a subject which is of vital interest to Chief Information Officers and IT Managers, addressing questions such as:
* How does the IT department keep pace with business change?
* How do we provide stable and responsive IT platforms?
* How do we add recognised value to the organisation?
* How do I reinvent my department?
* How do I get onto the board?

It offers an alternative view of the new roles of the in-house IT function and proposes a rethink about IT services within companies, suggesting a self-help approach to redefining/reinventing in-house IT for CIOs.

The author explains that new modes of business thinking and operation are essential if a company is to succeed in the near future and in light of this covers topics such as self-organising systems, knowledge management, multi-stakeholder perspectives, and empowerment initiatives in relation to the overall business and in particular the IT function.

Each chapter contains implementation templates for the readers to take themselves through the repositioning or reengineering of the IT function and their own departments.